About your Search

20121218
20121218
SHOW
Today 6
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 48
SFGTV2 42
MSNBCW 25
MSNBC 23
FOXNEWS 19
CNN 17
CNNW 17
WMAR (ABC) 16
KGO (ABC) 14
FBC 13
WUSA (CBS) 13
KPIX (CBS) 12
WBAL (NBC) 12
WRC (NBC) 12
KTVU (FOX) 11
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 451
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 454 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it is a good idea, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues
would like to call up two of our committee members on stage if you could all join us please, and if you could all give them a big round of applause so my name is shady and i work with themary's city ever services here in city call hall and i want to welcome great a i think this thure we programmed over ten institutions in the city of san francisco including the air film festival the arab culture and committee center but also with the tamp pais public library to have two events showcasing the rich arab america culture that exists here in the city of san francisco and i want to thank you all for coming and i want to introduce joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community in
ourselves up to greater liability by use of tasers. >> let's go into public comment. >> i have a few cards that i can call moving forward. and a few let's see lisa alator. michael gos from the mental health association and mckay davis from the aclu. >> good morning, supervisors and staff, and members of the community. thanks for holding this hearing today. my name is lisa alator i, i am a resident of san francisco and i am an organizer with the coalition of homelessness and today i am proud to stand with my community members and my colleagues to say strongly that san francisco does not want tasers and san francisco does not need tasers. >> san francisco police department has been given the chance to set a national precedent in how they respond to crisis situations through the implementations of the crisis intervention team. instead of prioritizing the training and the culture shifts that are necessary to save the lives of our vulnerable populations he is offering a new weapon to be used. numerous studies shows that they are a deadly weapon that do nothing to lower fatality or police shooti
. >>> abe time time this morning for a telephone call with u.s. president barack obama. they talked about meeting next month in washington. it would be abe's first foreign visit after forming a new government. he's made strengthening the japan-u.s. relationship a priority. we have more from washington. >> people in the obama administration place a high priority on stability in the asia-pacific. they have been troubled by increase in tension between japan and china over which country owns the islands in the east china sea. and they're concerned the conflicting flames allowed to fester, it could unsettle the dynamic in the region. they want to see security policies and sophisticated diplomacy to calm the situation. u.s. leaders are worried of being drawn into a military confrontation because of their alliance with japan. >> our message to the new japanese government is the same assed to former japanese government, is that we want to see both japan and china avoid provocative acts. we want to see them talk to each other and work this through by dialogue. >> reporter: now japan is tied up in
and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is going to be a lot more jobs created, a lot more people out therein venting new ways to establish small businesses that will improve the way we live and work and play in the city. and we look forward to great events like a super bowl host or something like that, we're going to be able to give people a really rich amount of programs that they could access from here to santa clara to san jose. we can act regionally with our data and we can join and continue to be in the great city of san francisco. so, i want to thank all of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce
. if there is no further business to come before us, i wish to recognize dodi allen for the purpose of making a motion to adjourn. >> [inaudible] >> recognizing john abernathy -- don abernathy for the purpose of a second. >> [inaudible] >> all those in favor of adjournment, say aye. >> aye. >> i now turn it over to our distinguished secretary of state, alain marshall. >> thank you for a job well done. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your service today. i want to thank the participants as well as those of you here to watch history being made. history in this historical room and people watching us across the state through modern technology, this is truly a moment to reflect upon what good citizenship is all about. before everybody does start to leave, let me remind the electorates, if i can ask you to return to your seat so we can pass those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
photo sharing site says they're going to sell your pictures without paying you or even telling you. use, are already jumping ship. we'll tell you how this affects you and your money. >>> plus will this be the first republican controlled house ever to raise taxes? business mogul steve forbes will join me in a fox business exclusive to break it all down. >>> the dire warning for you and all of your savings today. hackers are planning to clean out your bank account. the former deputy director of the national security agency is here with all the details so you can hang on to your cash. even when they say it's not, it is always about money. melissa: all right. first let's take a look at the day's market headlines. another day of gains on wall street. stocks soared for the second day in a row. the dow closed up 115 points and all that illusion that washington is getting its act together but progress on the fiscal cliff isn't driving everything higher. gold hit its lowest level in since late august that is confidence there. investors flee from the precious metal as a safe haven appeal fades. g
be in room a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you. >> san francisco is home to some of the most innovative companies of the 21st century. this pioneering and forward looking spirit is alive in san francisco government as well. the new headquarters of the san francisco public utilities commission at a5 25 golden gate avenue is more than just a 13-story building and office ablation. instead, city leaders, departments and project managers join forces with local architectural firms ked to build one of the greatest office buildings in america. that's more than a building. that's a living system. ♪ ♪ when san francisco first bought this land in 1999, it was home to a state office building. >> this was an old eight-story brown building the state owned and the workers' comp people were in that building. it was an old dee correctvth it building for decades. when i was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the may
for the u.s. car company. in today's cover story, are budget talks in washington killing chrismas for retailers? plus, the winter trade. the sectors of the stock market that go up when temperatures drop. dairy dollars - how entrepreneurs can learn from the latest greek yogurt craze. what small businesses need to do now to prepare for 2013. first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's tuesday, december 18th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: soaring stocks. the dow rallied 100 points higher yesterday, with the other indices following suit along with gold and oil. oil was up on hopes of a budget deal out of washington. boeing's buying back $3.6 billion shares is getting trader buzz. the company is also pushing up its dividend by 10%. microsoft founder bill gates is upping his stake in in deere & company to 7% from 5.8%. deere closed last night at $86. in the fallout from the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, which remains on our minds, some interesting stats: reports say gun rights groups
when he has a gun it is a huge responsibility. if you use the weapon irresponsible plea -- irresponsibly, you could cause yourself trouble off, death even to people that you did not intend to do harm to. it makes you very careful. or it should make you very careful. for most people it does. it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of a test before they get a license. you did not always have to with a gun in many localities. >> craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and gun control in america. and from living with guns, a liberal pays for the second amendment. saturday night at 10:00 eastern. part of four days of non-fiction books and authors through christmas days. as the electoral college met monday, we spoke with a social studies teacher at pioneer high school in ann arbor, mich., about how she teaches the look for a process in use the c-span as a resource. >> tracie van newsom is a high school and social studies teacher. >> tracy is a high-school social studies and history teacher. fellow, and she is joining us on the phone. what is y
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
, this disarms in many instances and allows us to engage. this level of training is taking place and we are doing it in connection with a multitude with different agencies both public and private in san francisco. we are currently going to have four additional trainings this coming year. we are also having discussions with the university of san francisco to model what has taken place in memphis, with the memphis police department and the university of memphis. i will stop right there, because i think that perhaps, probably good time to answer questions. >> supervisor compos? >> i want to thank you for hearing this important item and i want to thank the police department for being here and i know that the chief had to leave and we appreciate his comments and we have a number of members of the community who have been tracking these for years. the issues of tasers is something that something that san francisco like many other cities has been graveling with for quite some time. let me begin by saying that i am certainly in support of giving police officers the tools they need to do the job and i thin
. mayor. (applause). . >> yeah, mayorly thank you very much for the letting us use your house here tonight and letting -- we really appreciate it we know that you ran from the game to get here and so we really appreciate your commitment to our community and we are happy that you are here to celebrate this momentous day with us. we have an awesome community here, we are here to celebrate the awesomeness of our community the dedication of our community and, you know we are hebe here to serve all of you so really this award should go to everybody here in our community. thank you very much. (applause). >>> and i just want to echo jeff's words and say thank you for having us here today and thank you all for joining us and we look forward to many more arab heritage month celebrations and as well as our bigger community center and you know, through all of the different work that we do in different arab organization, different community organizationings it's about strengthening our community and contributing to the amazing cultural land scam of our city and we are very thankful to here
long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to the public utilities commission and ask the public utilities commission in about february to adopted -- not to exceed rates. it's our projected rate that is behind that bill premium i showed you, and that
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
those studies. so that is another reason for us not even to consider using them in this city because you don't know what effect they have on perfectly innocent people. >> thank you very much. >> i believe that the donation was for defibrillators not for the tasers. >> the next speaker, please? >> good afternoon, i just wanted to make three quick points. first of all i am from iowa. i know you probably thinking what does that have to do with anything? i took the emta course in iowa. >> speak in the mic. >> i am sorry. >> i am from iowa, i took the emta course in iowa. which was a year-long. to be able to go into the emt d program which was the problem to use the defibrillator you had to go through the basic training to be able to get into the defib and it was another nine-month course. i'm thinking how are we going to train police officers in a short time to be able to use them effectively? >> another thing is i wish that i would have brought the article to bring copies for you gentleman and lady. >> on the places that have done away with tasers because of malfunctions. and if you would l
elected i have always appreciated that you have mentoring those of us who are entering into the field after you and not a lot of elected officials do that to give their advise and support and i appreciate the support that you have given to me and i also want to say that i have an incredible apt of respect fortitude you have and the honesty and the way you carry yourself as-woman and a woman leader and it's rare to see that type of leadership and those of us in this field admire those qualities about and you see how incredible you have moving through a lot of different types of politics and fundraisings and lots of other things and so i want to thank you again for being that role-model and i appreciate what you have done. >> supervisor kim, i also want to add a few words for myself. fee i don't evenna you [spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take a moment to colleagues remind
to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles definitely need to be treated differently, and certainly
with mentally ill people, they don't use them. okay, you could argue well in the environment of a hospital the psych teches work there are no weapons, but that argument holds no, does not have any validity because the vast majority of cases where people are tased no weapon was involved on the part of the victim. it is true that the... it is true that there is a higher percentage of them that have been tased. this is from national data. and i think that it is also just manifestly obvious that it is going to be used for in cases of lack of compliance, rather than dangers, no tasers. >> i oppose the use of tasers and i am not from the city but i have friends and family here in sf and i am from southern county and i am here because i would oppose the use of tasers in my city just as would oppose it and i am taking steps to make sure that the county is addressing these concerns. and i lived in the city for series of years when i got my ba in psychology at san francisco state and i am also a social worker. and general and i want to say that in does not take a rocket scientist to speculate that t
to realize our success on this issue. at the same time he challenges us to respond to a moral obligation that is at the core of our mission as communities of faith. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun
are actually reading the entire e i r because i think most of us skim through the e i r's and skim through and but i doubt that most of us go through the e i r's and you turned to me and said, this is actually my third time reading it. that was a standard you set a bar for me when you is he that to me and that was a bar that i felt i had to be able to come close to may be not the third time but, i really do respect that. i have always admired your dedication and the faint that you don't lie to come in unprepared to an ortho argument and i do apologize that i was not able to replace chris daily in that role to continue the lively debates and discussion that is had happened prior to me. i know that you used to be -- there used to be that diagonal dynamic that habe is not as in existence as it was in the past but i'll say one thing sean, in admire ages i did not find that appeal on your birthday and i hope you remember that one when i call on you your birthday when i call on you in work ring for the city and county of fraction and also i have a lot of respect for your love and dedication t
the obama administration has conducted more than 200,000 deportations of parents with children who are u.s. citizens over a period of about two years. according to federal data, nearly one-quarter of all deportations from july 1, 2010 to the end of the september for issued for parents with u.s. citizen children. colorlines reports the data appears to dash hopes that new guidelines issued for deportations last year would curb the separation of families by immigration and customs enforcement. the prosecutorial discretion guidelines instruct ice agents to focus on certain immigrants, including those with criminal convictions, and to consider a person's ties to the country and "whether the person has a u.s. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent" when making deportation decisions. a group of new jersey residents who say they're subjected to surprise pre-dawn, immigration rates has reached a settlement of the federal government. most of the plaintiffs were either citizens or lawful residents of the united states when they said armed immigration and customs and mores and agents i
. >> reporter: today the investment firm that makes the type used in the attack said it's selling the company describing the massacre as a watershed event. dick's sporting goods also said it will suspend selling military-style weapons. while in washington. >> reporter: my little brother derek rimstad was riddled with bullets in sacramento, california. >> reporter: the families of gun victims were on capitol hill. >> reporter: our daughter was killed in aurora on july 20th of this year. >> reporter: demanding new gun regulation. calling the massacre a tipping point, the mayors issued a letter calling for the president to ban assault weapons and high intensity magazines. and to eliminate gun show loopholes. the police union also came out in support of a new assault weapons ban. while some influential democrats are speaking out in support of a gun law, today the first signs of opposition from republicans. >> we did have an assault weapons ban for 10 years. the crime rate was going down before it. the crime rate when it was lifted continued to go down. >> reporter: the nra is promising a news con
because we live on a major fault so what does this mean for us? part of what it means is that potentially 25% of san francisco's building stock will be uninhibit tabl and people can't stay in their homes after an earthquake. they may have to go to shelters or leave entirely and we don't want that to happen. >> we want a building stock to encourage them to stay in the homes and encourage them to stay and not relocate to other locations and shelters. >> that's right so that means the housing needs to be safe enough to stay and we have been focused in trying to define what that means and you as a former building official knows better than anybody the code says if an earthquake happens it won't kill you but doesn't necessarily say that can you stay in your home and we set out to define what that might mean and you know because you built this house we're in now and this shows what it's like to be in a place safe enough to stay. it's not going to be perfect. there maybe cracks in the walls and not have gas or electricity within a while but can you essentially camp out within your unit. what'
are comfortable calling before anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better
for an action. >> good to have you with us tonight. folks, thanks for watching. almost 24 hours ago, president obama called for a change in this country. now, it's up to all of us to make sure changes come to pass. the community of newtown connecticut is still deeply mourning the lives of 26 people, 20 of them children. the president struck an almost impossible balance of heartfelt emotion and out rage. clearly, president obama feels the weight of the moment. no american can relive the horror of this. >> we can't tolerate this anymore. these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. we will be told that the causes of such violence are complex and that is true. no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil from the world or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society. but that can't be an excuse for an action. surely, we can do better than this. >> this is a moment in history where an event alters the direction of a country and moves lawmaker fos unity. diane feinstein was the first to announce an update on an assault weapons ban which she introduced in congress and wil
walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome anne lamott to the program. her latest project is called, i love this, "help, thanks, wow: the three essential prayers." i love the title. i love the book. i love the packaging. i love the layout. >> thank you. tavis: it packs a powerful punch. how're people responding to a run the country? >> great, but i brought to a little something, a present for you when your mother. i brought a present. this is for you. this is a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get ove
on, pressure on the price of oil, indisexposeble incomes and henry joins us now. 2013, what does pressure on the price of oil mean? >> downward, i think. i think what we see is some significant nonopec finds. we see falling u.s. demand, rising supply. we see miles driven. there's technology at play. probably the biggest thing that could happen to the auto industry and we can come on to that. that's only a few years out. the message from the futures market that we're get sg oil should be some $10 to $15 lower. if we were to get $10 off the oil price, it broadly equate toes about 1% gdp surprising the western world. it's that time of year where we're pending our thoughts to next year. tangible, economic prices to next year. it will be oil related, a chance, good job with raising the tax threshold in the uk. that means for the first year in five. uk link will be up, not down. and them i also think thattory thing our chancellor did a good job of was she raised taxes by 10 so companies can invest a 215 pounds, not just 200 pounds. >> that's a leverage the other governments have been t
segue tours there are two ways to use a scooter to venture through golden gate park. tour or a rental in the company of a guard that can whiz you through the park tour and see the conservatory of flowers. >> so much fun. woo. >> segways on a echo way to see gold park. check it out and stop by after your tour of the tea garden. it's a great way to play in the park. this way you can chill in the japanese garden go to the tea house and then segway here at golden gate park. >> so, we're just going to take you through this really quickly. over 200 parks, over 1100 facilities are all contained within this. everything is based around you as a human being have your app. if you're looking for a park or if you're not familiar with any of the parks here in the city are, this app is a perfect accessory. so we're basically zooming in on the map right now. you can see the clustering 2 12 parks. as you get closer in, it lets you know where you're at. i'll zoom in on a park. you can see many different parks here. if you go to dolores, we'll start to see all of the facilities that they have availa
knock to clex the weapons used that they want to know where those weapons. every one is examing for the. nthey includes another and thigh are interviewing are fortunately have to include the children from the school that survived the shooting. there are many, many witnesses that need to be interviewed. authorities are saying they had no contact with adam lanza and he was not a known criminal in newtown, connecticut. >> there was no connection school or school here. nand investigators said that adam lanza drove to the school and had four guns in the coor carry three of them in the school. we'll do everything tatakes to uncover the evidence and conduct interviews and paint a clear picture as to how and why this tragedy occurred. >> a live update and the investigation from connecticut state police. fox news correspondant molly lime in newtown, connecticut. >> greta there is it new information not as much as in the beginning and the days following, but they revealed in that home, in the home where nancy lanza's body was found there were computers and they were smashed up and looking in phon
three, jenna bush hager will be joining us. she herself having been a teacher. we'll share some thoughts about that. and then we're going to take a turn toward the holidays. we've got three amazing gingerbread homes. these are more than homes. these are incredible structures. >> gingerbread mansions? >> some mansions. one is a cathedral. >> i've been nibbling at those all morning. is that wrong? >> i know. i wanted to speak to you about that. three finalists competing in our quest for the best competition. how will the cookie crumble? we'll find out. >>> also, if you still have christmas shopping, we have some must-have tech gifts for you from old school pacman, ghost lamp, the a remote controlled angry bird. >> we're calling it "tech the halls." >> i like that. did you just come up with that? >> yeah. not really. >>> but first, we want to get the latest on newtown, connecticut. let's go to natalie morales. good morning again to you. >> good morning. with just a week to go until christmas, you see the christmas tree in the center of town is now growing into a makeshift memorial. it's cov
. another case we see is for deliveries. suzy cakes uses task rabbit to get her goodies out. these tasks rabbits are using their own vehicles to do the deliveries. it is typically for a quick five-minute stop. one thing we have been brainstorming with the city about is whether there is a collaborative consumption parking pass or parking network. i know you have some thoughts for this on get around. there's something to consider in that area as you have this network of people out running around doing these deliveries and working with small businesses. how can we make it easier for the small businesses to thrive while using a network like task rabbit? >> i would like to follow up and stress that we are eager not just to deal with the problems of ancient regulations but also help the city work together on opportunities. there are enormous opportunities that airbnb presents to the city. tourism is one of the most important economic activities in san francisco. there's great concern by neighborhood groups that economic activity is not going to reach the further out neighborhoods in the city d
, you know, it is pretty out there. [laughter] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times ove
that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my mom flew in tonight. my brother, who works for bart. [applause] i have my nephew, who is here tonight. i want him to see me so he can follow my footsteps sunday to give back to the community. with me here are my managers and supervisors. i also have my longtime friend, jamie, who has been here. i see my former boss here. i have been nominated so many times. it really feels like you won an oscar. lastly, i wanted to thank my husband, who has been not just a husband to me, but he has been my chauffeur -- [laughter] mi
a conversation or retain the sunday sermon you used to look forward to all week? how about being confused while driving- forgetting directions someone gave you, forgetting where you're going, or even worse... forgetting how to get home? imagine that? well if you're experiencing more than your share of mental confusion and frustration., then today's show is for you. medical science can correct many of the challenges of old age -from synthetic joints to improving mobility to prescription glasses to instantly correct age-related vision loss - but when our mind and memory begin to fail, many people wonder what can modern science do? is it even possible for an age-ravaged brain to be brought back to 'normal again?' today, we'll learn about an amazing technological breakthrough that may do for the brain what prescription glasses do for the eyes. it's a brain-boosting memory pill that may make tired, old brains feel young again. my guest today, is a gifted head and neck cancer surgeon, he's a phd of psychologist as well. he is an expert on the brain, and knows firsthand about this remarkable life-chan
a final volley of shots. lanza had used one of the handguns to take his own life. a.t.f. officials now tell us lanza and his mother went shooting together at various ranges over the past several years but, scott, they still don't know if adam lanza practiced in recent weeks. >> pelley: bob, you mentioned there was a fourth gun. do the investigators have a theory on what he intended to do with that? >> that fourth gun was a shotgun capable of carrying a large drum of ammunition. lanza left it behind in the car's truck. police say they're not sure what he intended to do it with but it suggests maybe he was thinking of a broader attack. >> pelley: bob, thanks very much. we asked correspondent seth doane to talk to people who could paint a broader picture of adam lanza. >> reporter: what kind of kid was adam lanza as a classmate. >> just quiet. >> reporter: this girl remembers adam lanza from german class. >> on one side he did something unspeakable, on the other, that's not how i remember him. i remember him as the nice kid that i sat near in class and, you know, we joked, he'd laugh, tha
thomas roberts a few hours ago that the weapon used at sandy hook did not meet that distinction. >> we have to remember, connecticut has the fifth toughest gun control laws in the country, including an assault weapon ban that bans 35 different weapons. the weapon that was used was not an assault weapon. therefore, it wasn't banned. >> indeed, a bushmaster ar-15 rifle like the one lanza used is legal in connecticut despite the assault weapon ban there as long as it lacks two of certain futures, like a grenade launcher and a bayonet mount. in fact, it's the most popular rifle in america. owned by some 3 million people. this model at bud's gun shop just sold out online this very afternoon. another model seen here from the bushmaster's website shows the many features of such a weapon, and heard on the video, a chilling reminder of the sound that rang through the school as the shooting began on friday morning. a horrifying noise, if ever there was one. i want to bring in nbc news justice correspondent pete williams with us from washington. pete, this weapon that lanza used at sandy hook ele
for five days. >> they kept us blindfolded, bound. we weren't physically beaten or tortured. a lot of psychological torture. they made us choose which one of says would be shot first and when we refused, there were mock shootings. >> we will have more on their harrowing escape coming up. >>> classes for other students are resuming in newtown for the first time since friday's deadly school massacre. as two more young victims are laid to rest today. in washington is the momentum for gun control finally building? house democratic leader nancy pelosi called for a ban on assault magazines like those used to kill the 27 victims in connecticut. >> why is it that somebody needs a magazine with 20 shots in it and have 40 lives at risk? >> we'll talk exclusively with nancy pelosi about what can be done to control guns. and, of course, the looming fiscal cliff. speaker boehner today turns to his plan b. >> our plan b would protect american taxpayers who make $1 million or less and have all of their current rates extended. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. we here at nbc and
having problems, including adam lanza but says he never thought of lanza as a threat. ashleigh, tell us about the emotion that you are seeing. obviously, a lot of people who are -- they are burying their dead. at same time, trying to move on and give their other children a sense of hope in this community. >> one of the things i've been noticing surrounding communities, people from surrounding communities have been coming here to pay their respects, just to be a part of it somehow, show they are with the people of newtown and they support them in their grief. it's almost unbelievable the number of people with tears in their eyes just walking down the street. you can't walk anywhere near i am without encountering someone with a child or two adults walking hand in hand, crying, because they've just dropped off flags or teddy bears or candles or origami or some christmas ornament with the name of a child. we all know it's okay to be walking done street crying. everyone seems to understand. that's what this is all. and i just want to let you know also, there's a cafe i've been frequenting an
. and that is a fact that the right is not willing to concede. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politicsnation" with al sharpton starts right now. >>> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, this time it's different. we've watched senseless gun violence for too long. and too many times we've watched things return to the status quo again and again. but not this time. the white house says the president is actively supportive of efforts to reinstate an assault weapons ban. we learned today he's also asking his cabinet members for other proposals to curb gun violence. and the top democrat in the house. made it clear the time for action is now. >> i think there's a better chance to do that now than ever. not that one child's life is more important than another person's life, but the volume, the impact of this that every child can feel vulnerable. the fact there's been so many events in close proximity and timewise to each other that this is almost a tipping point. >> it is a tipping point. democrats are looking to push a bill this week that would ban high-ca
's not a conversation. that's a stalemate. we will have to change, the president told us from newtown over the weekend, and he's absolutely right. we all want to prevent another tragedy. so let's have a real serious conversation about it for once. okay. that does it for "the cycle." martin, it's all yours. >> s.e., i would be interested to hear your response to what jeffrey swanson, professor of psychiatry said when he said we're not even good at preventing minor violence. when you're talking about a mass shooting, that's a needle in the haystack. the mental health issues are not that straightforward are they? >> no, they're not. they're incredibly complex. the policies are incredibly complex. there are already laws on the books that do not adequately deal with this, but it's a conversation we need to have and we need to have it more often. >> okay. thank you, s.e., and thank you all of you on "the cycle." good afternoon. it's tuesday, december 18th, and as those killed in newtown are laid to rest, now is the time for action. >> that's the picture. that's the emotion that will pull this thing. >> the
. they were wearing ski machx. they were heavily armed. they dragged us out of the car. they had a container truck positioned waiting by the side of the road. they put us into that container truck. we were with some gunmen, some rebels who were escorting us. they executed one of them on the spot. then they took us to a series of safehouses and interrogation places. >> well, nbc news has no confirmation of the identity of those kidnappers. richard engel, of course, a veteran correspondent, says he has a good sense of who they were. >> this was a group known as the shabiha. this is a government militia. these are people who are loyal to president bashir al assad. they are shiite. they were talking openly about their loyalty to the government, openly expressing their shia faith. they are trained by iranian revolutionary guard. they are allied with hezbollah. we were told that they wanted to exchange us for four iranian agents and two lebanese people who are from the amma movement, and they want other members that have been captured by the rebels, they captured us in order to carry out this exch
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 454 (some duplicates have been removed)